Sales And Marketing Director Business Strategy

As a Sales And Marketing Director, its very critical for you to understand developing brand strategy is extremely critical. The most important asset your company has is its brand. Quite simply, it drives the direction of your business. So you should definitely have a well thought out brand strategy in place.

Increasing competition in business develops similar products with good quality from different manufacturers. But only an effective, innovative and Supply Chain & planning can make your business and products more popular.

For your profession as Sales And Marketing Director it becomes your responsibility to stay connected with like-minded supporting industry experts who can guide and help you deal with your day to day work issues.

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The Agile Solopreneur And Growing Business Needs

If you are entrepreneurial in nature owning a business is very exciting adventure. It can also be the most difficult thing for you to get into if you are not prepared.

Market segmentation is widely defined as being a complex process consisting in two main phases:

- identification of broad, large markets

- segmentation of these markets in order to select the most appropriate target markets and develop Marketing mixes accordingly.

Everyone within the Marketing world knows and speaks of segmentation yet not many truly understand its underlying mechanics, thus failure is just around the corner. What causes this? It has been documented that most marketers fail the segmentation exam and start with a narrow mind and a bunch of misconceptions such as "all teenagers are rebels", "all elderly women buy the same cosmetics brands" and so on. There are many dimensions to be considered, and uncovering them is certainly an exercise of creativity.

The most widely employed model of market segmentation comprises 7 steps, each of them designed to encourage the marketer to come with a creative approach.

STEP 1: Identify and name the broad market

You have to have figured out by this moment what broad market your business aims at. If your company is already on a market, this can be a starting point; more options are available for a new business but resources would normally be a little limited.

The biggest challenge is to find the right balance for your business: use your experience, knowledge and common sense to estimate if the market you have just identified earlier is not too narrow or too broad for you.

STEP 2: Identify and make an inventory of potential customers' needs

This step pushes the creativity challenge even farther, since it can be compared to a brainstorming session.

What you have to figure out is what needs the consumers from the broad market identified earlier might have. The more possible needs you can come up with, the better.

Got yourself stuck in this stage of segmentation? Try to put yourself into the shoes of your potential customers: why would they buy your product, what could possibly trigger a buying decision? Answering these questions can help you list most needs of potential customers on a given product market.

STEP 3: Formulate narrower markets

McCarthy and Perreault suggest forming sub-markets around what you would call your "typical customer", then aggregate similar people into this segment, on the condition to be able to satisfy their needs using the same Marketing mix.
Start building a column with dimensions of the major need you try to cover: this will make it easier for you to decide if a given person should be included in the first segment or you should form a new segment. Also create a list of people-related features, demographics included, for each narrow market you form - a further step will ask you to name them.

There is no exact formula on how to form narrow markets: use your best judgement and experience. Do not avoid asking opinions even from non-Marketing professionals, as different people can have different opinions and you can usually count on at least those items most people agree on.

STEP 4: Identify the determining dimensions
Carefully review the list resulted form the previous step. You should have by now a list of need dimensions for each market segment: try to identify those that carry a determining power.

Reviewing the needs and attitudes of those you included within each market segment can help you figure out the determining dimensions.

STEP 5: Name possible segment markets
You have identified the determining dimensions of your market segments, now review them one by one and give them an appropriate name.

A good way of naming these markets is to rely on the most important determining dimension.

STEP 6: Evaluate the behavior of market segments

Once you are done naming each market segment, allow time to consider what other aspects you know about them. It is important for a marketer to understand market behavior and what triggers it. You might notice that, while most segments have similar needs, they're still different needs: understanding the difference and acting upon it is the key to achieve success using competitive offerings.

STEP 7: Estimate the size of each market segment

Each segment identified, named and studied during the previous stages should finally be given an estimate size, even if, for lack of data, it is only a rough estimate.

Estimates of market segments will come in handy later, by offering a support for sales forecasts and help plan the Marketing mix: the more data we can gather at this moment, the easier further planning and strategy will be.

These were the steps to segment a market, briefly presented. If performed correctly and thoroughly, you should now be able to have a glimpse of how to build Marketing mixes for each market segment.

This 7 steps approach to market segmentation is very simple and practical and works for most marketers. However, if you are curious about other methods and want to experiment, you should take a look at computer-aided techniques, such as clustering and positioning.

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With the support of our professional business network, you get the opportunity to exchange experience and knowledge at a top professional level, and to strengthen and develop your own skills within your management and specialist areas.

Through business relationships and experience sharing in confidential settings for Sales And Marketing Director, we strive to create personal and business value for all our network peers.

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Solopreneurs who possess agile professional skills bring to the organizations with whom they work urgently needed expertise, often limited to a specific assignment and for a predetermined length of time. Agile Solopreneurs provide great insight, heightened productivity and relevant experience to countless mission-critical projects.

Agile innovation first swept through the Information Technology sector and greatly increased success rates in software development, improving product quality and speed to market. Agile management techniques are spreading to other industries and Solopreneur consultants ought to be aware of what is involved, both as regards the ways your clients and prospects may buy into agile practices and how you might incorporate certain agile methods into your consultancy.

More so than in the past, business ventures now exist in highly dynamic conditions. Customer priorities and technological advancements are known to change rapidly. Keeping a finger on the pulse of new developments and innovating or adapting as necessary the company's products and services in response are essential. Marketing strategies, advertising buzz words and sales strategies operate on short-term cycles that fit the parameters of social media platforms. This fast-moving environment demands the stewardship of leaders who command agile skills. But what does agile mean in practice?

Agile does not mean doing the usual thing, only faster. Darrell Rigby, a partner at Bain & Company consulting and Hirotaka Takeuchi, professor of strategy at the Harvard Business School and CEO of Scrum, Inc., a consulting and training firm, describe agile business practices as containing the following elements:

  • Scrum: Creative and adaptive teamwork that solves complex problems.
  • Lean development: That focuses on the continual elimination of waste.
  • Kanban: That focuses on reducing lead times and the amount of time needed to complete a process.
Agile management practices are particularly well-suited to strategic planning activities, marketing campaigns, resource allocation decisions and supply chain challenges. Agile works best where complex problems can be broken down into modules and assigned to specific teams. Examples of ideal conditions in which to apply agile innovation or methods include:

  • When the solutions to an obstacle or challenge are unknown
  • When the specifications of a product in development may be subject to change
  • When the scope of work to be done on a project is not precisely known
  • When cross-functional collaboration is presumed to be vital and time to market is sensitive
In order to expand (or at least maintain) one's billable hours, Solopreneurs would be wise to acquire agile skills (books, blogs and certifications are available) and promote your proficiency when selling intangible B2B services to prospects. Decision-makers at organizations that are faced with a mission-critical project, challenge, or opportunity may feel more confident about hiring a Solopreneur who can bring agile methods and problem-solving approaches to the table.

External Solopreneur consultants must always present ourselves as being dependable, trustworthy, capable and able to meet or exceed the clients' expectations by way of the cutting-edge skills that we possess. In this way, we make hiring managers and project sponsors feel that they'll appear trustworthy and capable to their peers and superiors when they bring us on board. In this way we can build and sustain a viable consultancy.

Thanks for reading,

Kim

Networking has always been considered a powerful tool for improving business prospects, advancing a career, and developing ideas. Other than some brief, structured events, networking has been mostly informal and inexpensive in comparison to cost they otherwise spend on different channels. But membership is growing in many formal, long-term networking groups, and so is the price tag.

Our groups are not groups for generating sales leads, nor are they places where individuals can drop-in to gain quick advice on an immediate challenge.  Members also sign a confidentiality agreement and benefits from the guided mentoring to help each other.

These groups include an experienced facilitator and use a structured discussion method to ensure appropriate participation.